Thursday, May 24, 2012

A few random things

In case you haven't seen it over on our facebook page, The Signature Brass Quintet is playing the national anthem at next Monday's Tacoma Rainiers baseball game. Game time is 1:35, so I assume we'll play around 1:30. However, we've been given permission to play in the concourse for 30 minutes or so before the game, entertaining the guests as they head to their seats.

In addition, we'll be playing at the Pacific Avenue Street Fair in Tacoma on Sunday, June 10, from 3-4 p.m. It's at Stewart Middle School in Tacoma.  We'll do a mixture of jazz and Sousa marches and show tunes and classical and other fun stuff, tailored to the festive atmosphere of the moment.

Finally, I've been asked once again to play the national anthem and Taps for the Day Island Yacht Club Memorial Day wreath-laying ceremony at Fair Harbor Marina, this Monday at 10:00 a.m.

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Speaking of good music, you need to go listen to this.

And this.

Although you only have a few more days, so hurry.

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 In the 'just my opinion' department. . .last month I was reading some articles on the LA Times website when up popped the 'you've read your month's limit of free articles! To read more, you have to pay!' announcement. Shortly before that I had been poking around the Modesto Bee's website, and got the same announcement. Now comes the announcement that the Sacramento Bee is going to charge for access to their site. I'm curious to see how it all works out in the long run. As for me. . .I'll be avoiding those sites now.

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Here's an interesting tidbit about life on the Key Peninsula. A few weeks ago a homeless woman made her way onto the peninsula; an African-American, she was pushing a shopping cart full of supplies, and carrying signs talking about love and peace and the like. This is not your typical homeless person out here. Our homeless live back in the woods and are relatively stable, unlike the transients who you find in larger urban areas. So this woman stood out a bit.

Which meant that, by the third day, everybody out here had noticed her and was talking about her. All you had to ask was "So have you seen the woman with the shopping cart?" and everybody had a story. Some had seen her all the way down by our church; others had seen her in Key Center; others had passed her in Wauna and Purdy. Last Saturday, Craig and I were talking about her as we headed back from leading the youth group on a day hike, and wouldn't you know it - there she was, up the hill from Purdy.

I know some people checked in with her, so she wasn't ignored. But it's more the nature of this place that within a few short days, everybody knew about her, everybody was talking about her, everybody had seen her. I love that about rural communities; one thing out-of-the-ordinary happens, and in a flash, everybody knows.


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